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4 responses to “Viewers’ Guide to Prop 8 argument December 6”

  1. MikeA

    At least 1 factual mistake:
    You write that “The August 4 decision from Judge Vaughn Walker was the first time a federal court had struck down a statewide same-sex marriage ban”.
    But it wasn’t the 1st time.
    In 2005 another federal judge (Joseph F. Bataillon) made similar ruling, which was reversed by 8th Circuit Appellate Court.

  2. Anonygrl

    A major difference between these two cases is that Nebraska never had allowed same sex marriage, but for the space of several months, California did, and 18,000 couples took advantage of it. So this case is quite different as it deals with rights that were at one time granted, then taken away, whereas the Nebraska case did not.

  3. Guy Noir, Private Eye

    I think Cooper’s presentation was ‘just short of pathetic’…
    He seemed to Stumble & Stammer when asked questions, IMHO, he just wasn’t prepared.
    Olson, OTOH, was well prepared, AND: it Counts!

    Cooper’s reasoning was Weak, Olson’s was Strong.

    I believe P8 is DEAD, only waiting for the Grave to be Covered…

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