One response to “Openly gay man nominated to fed appeals court”

  1. John

    A hearty congratulations to Edward DuMont. His background seems to assure he’s qualified to adjudicate cases involving government contract claims, intellectual property, Indian tribes, and complicated tax refund litigation. Of course this very limited and narrowly circumscribed legal specialization also assures that (aside from cutting checks to failed activist groups like Equality California) he will be doing nothing to preserve LGBT rights from the bench. In this case his being openly gay is utterly irrelevant. Why should anyone care? Obama needs to be making LGBT appointments where they matter, where they can make a different to the community, instead of making token appointments that effectively muzzle dissent. When it comes to being a ‘sword and shield’ to protect our rights, Edward DuMont is now, for all practical purposes, taken out of circulation.

    However he is young and this may be a good proving ground for better things to come. In that light his professional representation in support of a religious group that successfully petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court for the right to use public school facilities to host a family values series is rather troubling. In Lamb’s Chapel v. Center Moriches School District, the Lamb’s Chapel evangelical church sought to show a series of family lectures by James Dobson on school property after school hours. The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously overturned the lower court’s decision to deny the church’s access to state (tax-funded) property claiming such use was permissible use because the films were not “church related.’ How any lecture on family values by the infamous James Dobson could not be church related escapes me, but the law is never that simple and the traditional “Lemon Test” itself provides a First Amendment loophole big enough to drive a truck through. “Mr. Jefferson! Build up this wall!” Moreover, all legal professionals understand that an attorney’s first ethical duty is ‘zealous advocacy’ for his client and not his personal agenda. During our careers most attorneys employed by law firms are often called upon to defend issues they find repugnant.

    Two things seem sure: by appointing Edward DuMont to narrowly circumscribed legal specialization, Obama stuck a token feather in his own cap and, more importantly, he cleverly decommissioned DuMont from any possibility of an advocacy role protecting the rights of his Community. He is effectively a ‘token’ gay safely appointed to a job where most certainly his being gay can not be of any relevance to us. Thanks anyway.

Leave a Reply

Your support keeps us going. Thank you!

Your support keeps us going. Thank you!

A Closer Look

Then Comes Marriage: A rare glimpse into conflict civil rights attorneys are loath to acknowledge

A new book provides a rare glimpse into something LGBT civil rights attorneys are loathe to talk about: How much they bicker behind-the-scenes. And the personal journey Roberta Kaplan lays to bare –evolving from a painfully closeted conservative to a headline-making lesbian attorney activist— is a riveting drama that is, in and of itself, worthy of the read.

» more

Breaking News

Houston rejects non-discrimination law; HRC predicts ‘tough battles ahead’

Sixty-one percent of Houston voters cast their ballots against the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance Tuesday. Mayor Annise Parker said opponents of the ordinance ran a “calculated campaign of lies designed to demonize a little understood minority.” But opponents said it was a pushback by the church to “stand up” in the “a Christian nation” and shows that supporters, like Hillary Clinton, are “out of touch with America.”

» more

Democratic debate: A stark contrast to GOP debate’s open hostility

Although it was the first debate among Democratic presidential hopefuls, Tuesday’s debate on CNN was most notable to LGBT viewers in how the candidates differed from their Republican counterparts. There was no talk of defending the right of Christian business owners to discriminate against same-sex couples, no derisive remarks about allowing transgender people to serve in the military, and no side-swipes against openly gay elected officials.

» more

Clinton promises to fight for LGBT Americans, Biden says the victories won in the past ensure the ease of future gains

There were some notable contrasts in the speeches of Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton and potential contender Joe Biden during their separate appearances before Human Rights Campaign events in Washington Saturday.

» more

Fiorina shines, Bush ‘contorts’ to the right, Walker and Perry are gone

People posting on the Log Cabin Republican’s Facebook timeline last Wednesday night overwhelmingly agreed that business executive Carly Fiorina was the winner. But not everyone was praising Fiorina after the debate.

» more

Supreme Court denies stay in Kentucky clerk bid to refuse marriage licenses

In a significant blow to those who seek to use a free exercise of religion argument to discriminate against same-sex couples seeking to marry, U.S. Supreme Court on Monday evening denied an emergency request to stop enforcement of a federal district court order that a Kentucky county clerk resume issuing marriage licenses.

» more