ad_facebook
ad_email_468

3 responses to “Mass. likens DOMA to Colorado initiative that Supreme Court struck down”

  1. John

    Yes. These are mean, inhuman, nasty gay jim crow laws enacted for no reason other than raw animosity. Congress has no more power to abrogate ‘fundamental’ rights than states do. Intended to protect ‘traditional marriage’? Rubbish, That canard can’t even get past the rational basis test. Legally it’s all a house of cards and it’s about time we stopped fearing the federal courts. Enough. This state by state approach is too slow and expensive. This is where the battle belongs. This is the only place we can win a decisive victory to win with no ‘separate but equal’ accommodationism. We can be sure that legislative repeal will come with a religious compose that only raises serious First Amendment issues – and the litigation will go on. Only the courts, applying basic bedrock legal principals, will be able to bring down this despicable house of cards. Of all those claiming to be activists, it’s the lawyers who are the most worthy of praise – and most worthy of funding. Get out your check books folks. THESE are the people who deserve the funding in tight times. When money is tight, I don’t have to think twice about who I might give my money to or ask where it will be the most effective. The litigators are the real heroes!

  2. Mombian » Blog Archive » Weekly Political Roundup

    [...] other big news this week was the hearing in Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. Health and Human Services, the second of two Massachusetts lawsuits aimed at striking down a major part of the federal [...]

  3. John

    States define and regulate a lot of things, but they may not do so in a manner that violates the U.S. Constitution which trumps all ‘separate but equal” jim crow rubbish. My authority? Easy. Loving v. Virginia. If the states had a right to “define and regulate marriage” as being between persons of the same race then, obviously, the Supreme Court would have sided with Virginia and against the Lovings and not struck down all states’ nefarious Jim Crow anti-miscegenation statues. Loving v. Virginia stands for the proposition that no state may define and regulate any right in a manner that violates the U.S. Constitution. In Loving and here that means the bedrock ‘equal protection’ principals laid out in the Fourteenth Amendment.

    All ‘persons’ are entitled to equal protection of the law – no matter what their class. The classification only matters where (as in both Loving and here) it is particularly suspect and invidious.

Leave a Reply

Your support keeps us going. Thank you!

Your support keeps us going. Thank you!

A Closer Look

Counting states and calculating odds: Marriage equality still waits for nod from Supreme Court to finish the jobCounting states and calculating odds: Marriage equality still waits for nod from Supreme Court to finish the job

Trying to keep up with the number of states now issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples has been tricky business the past few weeks. The number of new states coming “on line” with marriage equality have changed almost every day –sometimes back and forth. But Harvard law professor Laurence Tribe says that, when it comes to giving odds on the chance the U.S. Supreme Court will take and reverse a Sixth Circuit decision upholding state bans, he wouldn’t give odds much over 60-40.

» more


Breaking News

Sixth Circuit panel upholds bans on same-sex marriage, setting up national showdown for Supreme Court

In a decision that will compel the U.S. Supreme Court to rule on the constitutionality of bans against marriage for same-sex couples, a panel of the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled Thursday that it is not unconstitutional for a state to ban marriage licenses to same-sex couples or refuse to recognize marriage licenses such couples obtain from other states.

» more


Healey makes history, Maloney survives, DeMaio’s in a squeaker, but Michaud comes up short

Maura Healey became the first openly gay person elected as a state attorney general, Sheila Kuehl won a hotly contested race in Los Angeles, Sean Maloney survived his U.S. House challenge, and Carl DeMaio may have won a squeaker in San Diego, but Mike Michaud lost his bid in Maine.

» more


Michaud gets major boost from Obama and a surprise move by an opponent

Media attention on Maine’s gubernatorial race was split Thursday between President Obama’s rally for U.S. Rep. Mike Michaud’s bid to become the first openly gay person elected governor of any state and the shake-out over pro-gay third party opponent Eliot Cutler’s announcement that his supporters should feel free to vote for someone else.

» more


Next month’s elections may be one for the history books for LGBT candidates

This year’s election night is likely to be an important one for the LGBT history books: Voters in Massachusetts are expected to elect the nation’s first-ever openly gay state attorney general, and voters in Maine could very well elect the nation’s first-ever openly gay governor. Here are 10 races to watch November 4.

» more


Polis tries parliamentary maneuver in hopes of moving ENDA to the floor

Because House Speaker John Boehner has vowed to block ENDA from getting a vote, the discharge petition has become the only hope to force ENDA to the floor if the Republican-dominated chamber. U.S. Rep. Jared Polis, with the backing of Democratic House leaders, filed a petition with the House clerk. It’s a long-shot but ENDA supporters need to find just 16 signatures to get the ball rolling.

» more