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4 responses to “Kagan: ‘vigorously defended’ DADT”

  1. DavidTheLeo

    Say what they want to hear, you’re in. Say what they don’t want to hear and you’re out. Seems like an easy game of Mother May I.

  2. John

    As a Harvard official, she did her job and enforced university policy. As Solicitor General, she vigorously defended D.A.D.T. Inconsistent? Hypocritical? Absolutely not. I can’t think of better evidence that she is able to put her personal politics and personal agenda aside to do her job. She is outstanding! This woman will occupy a great place in Supreme Court history. The senators who crudely disparaged her, as if being Progressive was an epithet, only proved themselves small, petty and mean-spirited. I was delighted when she not only did not let them get away with it, but laughed in their face. They will go back and crawl under their rocks. She will have a bigger place in history. She will be a proud legacy for Obama presidency.

  3. Mombian » Blog Archive » Weekly Political Roundup

    [...] Senate Judiciary Committee questioned Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan over Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, among other [...]

  4. FlexSF

    Religious groups claim their religion will be harmed by gay legal equality, but gay legal equality advocates are wholly unassociated with religious groups. It appears that the religious groups have the problem, and seek to stop anyone that lives their lives, equally under the law, and subsequently leaves the religious groups in an irrelevant vacuum.

    Religious groups should stop telling others, via voter referendum, who may marry who.

    This practice is dead wrong, and infuriating to be on the receiving end! They wouldn’t tolerate it for themselves, so why do they treat others differently?

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