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6 responses to “Movement to ban gay adoption: sacrificing the well-being of children”

  1. Bill

    Heartbreaking. That heterosexuals would sooner see their ‘throwaway children’ ACTUALLY thrown away rather than live with a gay couple.

    Morality indeed, straight folks.

    Morality indeed.

  2. RE Bill

    Bill, I think it would be far more appropriate to say “That HOMOPHOBES would sooner…” rather than what you did say… I am a heterosexual, and I believe that any couple, traditional or otherwise, capable of caring for a child in a nurturing and loving environment should be able to do so. Addressing this to “straight folks” only makes you look ignorant.

  3. electrakitty

    I have zero issue with states saying that someone is not a good enough parent and barring him/her from adopting. Though I hate it, I could even accept (for now) that state saying that one is not a good enough parent because he/she is gay. But that’s not what these states are saying. They’re saying “You’re good parents. We’re just not going to legitimize your families.” And that’s not ok.

  4. Mombian » Blog Archive » New Study: Children of Same-Sex Parents Make Normal School Progress

    […] At which point I refer you to my piece on the pending adoption decision in Florida. […]

  5. Mombian » Blog Archive » LGBT Parenting Roundup

    […] Lesbian moms Vanessa Alenier and Melanie Leon spoke before the Florida Third District Court of Appeal, fighting to preserve Alenier’s adoption of her young nephew. The Department of Children and Families has requested the adoption be overturned because of the state law that prevents any lesbian or gay man from adopting. In January, a Miami-Dade circuit judge allowed the adoption, saying the ban was “unconstitutional on its face.” The more well known Florida adoption case of Frank Martin Gill was heard by the same court last August, and a ruling is still pending. […]

  6. Mombian » Blog Archive » Florida Adoption Ban Struck Down

    […] background on the case and its implications for adoption rights across the country, see my Keen News piece from July. via Twitter, Facebook, Digg, e-mail, and more 5:09 pm Politics and Law « […]

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