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3 responses to “Bullied to death: New cases shine light on old problem”

  1. NJel

    My prayers go out to the families involved in these tragedies. Yes, I’m a christian, but I don’t condone this behavior. Bullying is bullying regardless of who it’s directed towards. I, myself, am a homosexual, so I can sympathize with the pain, and I sincerely hope that the Lord helps your families through these difficult times.

    God bless =( *hug*

  2. Debra Chasnoff

    Thank you Dana, as always for your excellent reporting. I wanted to also let your readers know that if they are looking for ways to jumpstart a dialogue in their schools or at their dinner tables, please check out GroundSpark’s films about bullying, homophobia, gender norms and youth. It’s Elementary—Talking About Gay Issues in School, Straightlaced—How Gender’s Got Us All Tied Up, It’s STILL Elementary, and Let’s Get Real. All available for purchase or streaming via http://www.groundspark.org. Our staff conducts school district trainings on all of these issues. We are here to help and spark dialogue and activism.

  3. Heather Bridge

    Thank you for your excellent article. If you have a chance see the play now on tour, “Laramie Project Ten Years later” it is a telling look at how a community “remembers” an event of gay bashing and its aftermath. With young people so despondant that they feel death is the only option in the face of harassment, community amnesia is not acceptable.

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