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5 responses to “LGBT inclusions in immigration: posturing or real?”

  1. Don

    I am opposed to immigration “reform” (amnesty). This country is overpopulated, and 21 million Americans are out of work.

  2. Javier

    Our marriages should be treated the same as anyone else’s. Having said that, I particularly resent Senator Menendez’s linking bi-national same-sex married couples who seek marriage equality with their heterosexual counterparts to the outrageous claims of 15-20 million illegal entrants who have no right to be in the country in the first place. No amnesty!

  3. FAEN

    I would like to think they mean it but my gut tells me…..POSTURING!

  4. FAEN

    Don&Javier
    ——————————–
    Well I’ll be damned…the gay guys are anti immigrant!
    The UAFA bill SHOULD be a stand alone bill so I agree with you there. But claiming that (Comprehensive Immigration Reform) is amnesty is wrong. If you actually read the frameword, because that’s all it is right now, you would know that.

    The system we have now is broken, antiquated and makes no sense. We need a system that is modernized, and prevents undocumented immigration, not encourages it. You really think the vast majority of immigrants don’t want to come here legally? They would like nothing better; but for many immigrants contributing to our country, there is no legal way to get here because the system doesn’t give everyone a fair chance.

  5. Mike

    Your article mentions the estimated 36,000 bi-national same sex couples who currently face separation, but it does not give an estimate of how many bi-national couples are already forced to be apart. Nor does it mention the great loss to our country of people like myself, a highly educated and productive member of society, who must live abroad if we wish to be with our partners. My partner and I have been happily and successfully together for almost 20 years – longer than most of my heterosexual siblings’ and cousins’ unions made it – yet we are not able to live in the USA because my partner is not eligible for a spousal visa. We BOTH have much to contribute to the world around us, but because of bigotry and the way things are set up, I guess it won’t be the USA that will benefit from our contributions. Hopefully, that won’t be the case for long.

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