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2 responses to “Two groups send mixed message on DADT repeal timing”

  1. Mariah Colette, FL.

    I find it apalling how a man who speaks of equal rights for america, has the nerve to down the LGBT society. Are they not equal to that of any heterosexual being. Also, men and women are allowed to serve in the army together, so why is it that homosexuals can not serve in the armed forces with their significant other. All that matters is the fact that they are fighting for the freedom of America. It should not depend what their sexuality is. John McCain is arrogant in that he wishes to deny patriotic americans to serve their country due to thier sexuality. – mariah colette lbhs high school

  2. Karl Streips (Riga, Latvia)

    I have lived in Europe now for 20 years and am just appalled at what is happening in American politics, but in this particular case, specifically about John McCain. What is this man’s problem? First he said he wanted the military’s leaders to speak out. They did — in favor of repeal. Then he said that the views of the military leaders needed to be studied in greater detail. They were — in favor of repeal. Then he said that he wanted to know what service members think. They said yes to repeal. Now he’s saying that this, too, needs to be studied in greater detail. What’s to study, Senator? You’re in the minority. You won another six years in the Senate in November — why are you being such a jerk about this? It’s bad enough that you ruined your reputation by foisting Sarah Palin on America. Do you really need to ruin it further by claiming that the concept of equal protection in the United States Constitution actually does not apply equally to everyone? For shame, Senator! For eternal and damning shame!

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