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3 responses to “President: “Not going to make news” on marriage equality any time soon”

  1. Ted

    I’m glad the President isn’t letting himself be bullied by the gay activist agenda.

  2. Francoise

    Bullied by the activists gay agenda? Now that was a laugh that made my day! We all know who is doing the real bullying here and the real reason why Obama takes a segregationist’s classic Ronald Reagan ‘states rights’ position that is an insult to his own parents who were actually deemed criminals and whose marriage was illegal in may states such that California and Hawaii were amongst the few states in which they were safe.

    Of course the dissembling Obama speaks perfect Ketman and is smart enough to know that this is neither a matter for voters, for Congress, or any state legislature. This is a matter that can and will only be decided by SCOTUS so he’s probably smart not to enter the fray and just work to alter the high court’s composition if he can. But given the position of some current conservative justices who have ruled in our favor in the past, and considering the no-brainer legal dynamic, I really don’t think we need to fear the court – which is our best hope. As the late SCOTUS Justice Robert H. Jackson wrote,

    “The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to WITHDRAW CERTAIN SUBJECTS FROM THE VICISSITUDES OF POLITICAL CONTROVERSY, TO PLACE THEM BEYOND THE REACH OF MAJORITIES AND OFFICIALS AND TO ESTABLISH THEM AS LEGAL PRINCIPLES TO BE APPLIED BY THE COURTS. One’s right to life, liberty, and property, to free speech, a free press, freedom of worship and assembly, and other FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS MAY NOT BE SUBMITTED TO VOTE; THEY DEPEND ON THE OUTCOME OF NO ELECTIONS.”

    Thanks Lisa for an excellent report. Really. Without editorializing too much I think you have made the best contribution when it comes to informing the community. Much remains to be done. The very fact that Obama can appear before an LGBT audience and so cavalierly toss over the ‘states rights’ insult and get away with it with nary a bubble of protest from the so-called “bullies’ of the “gay activist agenda” is proof positive that, not only are too many of our ‘’activists’ toothless lap dog sycophants, our own leadership has left the lay community disgracefully ignorant of the no-brainer legal dynamic at play here.

    We can understand why Obama plays this cynical game of cat and mouse but in a game of cat and mouse, it’s usually the cat that wins. Obama will do as he feels he must do, but it’s a disgrace and dis-service to the Community when journalists no only pander to the same legal ignorance but lack the guts to call this so-called ‘civil rights lawyer’ out on the most rudimentary legal rubbish. I understand that it’s a calculated PR strategy but, frankly, pandering to ignorance at the same time we fuel it is not much of a strategy. Obama claims to revere Lincoln but he is clearly more of a dissembling Jefferson whose own children were given over to the hammer of the auction block. President Obama and the LBGT leadership b ut to paraphrase Lincoln, “I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth [and educated in basic law], they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The great point is to bring them the real facts [and educate them as to the bedrock law of our land].”

  3. Mombian » Blog Archive » Weekly Political Roundup

    [...] President Obama continued to avoid answering questions about his stance on marriage equality. [...]

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