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2 responses to “The bathroom scare: Old tactics aimed anew at trans-equality bills”

  1. neche

    “am I hiding, or waiting to ambush someone”.

    The above link is :safe for work: more’s the pity, ecause terrorizing of women is deemed amusing if men say it is, and if they tell us stopping it impedes their rights.

    This is how the transgendered view their oppression and terrorizing of women. This is what you enable. Over 90% of men who call themselves “transgendered” and say they have a right to use women’s washrooms are biological males with penises.

    Let them use the men’s rooms. They are men.

  2. Tony

    regarding the comment from neche:

    I’m not transgendered. In fact, I’m a very masculine gay male. So I’ve been in locker rooms and bathrooms around straight men when they have been freely making some really violent homophobic statements around me not knowing my sexual orientation. And frankly I’d be very concerned for the physical safety of a transgendered male to female (penis or not) who was forced to go into a men’s bathroom. They too have very real concerns about rape or being beaten up or much worse killed at the hands of some violent macho bigot.

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