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2 responses to “DADT repeal booed during GOP debate”

  1. Denny

    Let’s say I am in the military and I say to my buddy that I am against homosexuality. Let’s say that someone overheard that comment and reported that to their immediate supervisor who in turn called the person who made the homosexual comment in to be reprimanded ( so much for Unit Cohesion) for breaking the new U.S. Military’s new pro-homosexual policy of equal treatment and are repremanded and maybe even get permanent marks against you on your record. Question: Is this Homosexual Fascism or not? And if it is, then it is unconstitutional. Besides, tell me all of you pro-homosexuality folks, which nation that ever existed was based up preferential treatment of homosexuality and its many behaviors?
    Did George Washington fight the British Empire for the Special Rights Treatment of a fringe group of people to promote lifetyles that are in OPPOSITION to the Patriarchal Heterosexual Family Unit?

    Thanks for listening, 777denny

  2. Mombian » Blog Archive » Weekly Political Roundup

    [...] audience at the Republican presidential debate Thursday night booed when an active-duty soldier serving in Iraq asked if the candidates would [...]

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