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4 responses to “Santorum’s not the worst on gay issues”

  1. Chuck Anziulewicz

    Ever since Massachusetts became the first state to allow Gay couples to legally marry, hundreds of thousands of Gay couples across the United States have either legally married or had their civil unions or domestic partnerships officially registered. But Rick Santorum has expressly stated that those legal contracts will be officially made “null and void” under his administration. He has made it clear that he wants ONE law to define marriage in the United States, a law that will leave Gay couples with NO legal benefits and protections. That make the prospect of a Santorum administration an intensely personal issue for Gay Americans, even though he prefers not to dwell on the issue.

  2. tomchicago

    Terry, of course, is unwilling to own up to the vile history cloaked by his faith-based traditions. He clearly is correct with his no-brainer observation about the evil of slavery, but does not admit how the practice of slavery was condoned and justified by the so-called traditional values he would have us respect.

  3. thomas

    Calling Randall Terry a Democrat is absurd. He’s a Right Wing Extremist, of the Theocrat/Fascist kind, the antithesis of what the Democrats stand for. Anybody can register their name with either party, that doesn’t mean they represent them.

  4. kasjun

    Rick Santorum says he is against terrorists but when you listen to his speech yesterday in South Carolina you can’t tell him from a terrorist. Listen to what he said.

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